Essex County DWI News: Bloomfield Twp. Officers Join other Police for “Drive Sober” Campaign

From Patterson to Edison, and Trenton on down the Jersey Shore, police all across the Garden State will be working overtime looking for drunk drivers this coming Labor Day holiday. As part of this annual effort to rein in any number of intoxicated celebrants and other drivers operating their vehicles while under the influence of alcohol, doctor-prescribed meds, or illegal substances (drug DUI), the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign is already in effect.

Running from August 15 through September 1, dozens of police departments throughout the state have received funding for additional manpower to thwart errant drunken drivers during the holiday weekend and the days leading up to it. As New Jersey DWI defense lawyers, my legal staff knows that the stakes can be quite high for those motorists who are charged with driving while intoxicated. These days, the fines, fees and mandatory insurance premium increases can total in the thousands of dollars, which can cause significant hardship on some individuals if convicted of DWI-DUI.

As long-time DWI-DUI defense attorneys, my colleagues and I firmly believe that our system of law was created to provide a balance between the police who arrest and charge individuals and the defendants who believe they were unjustly accused. Getting one’s day in court, however, will usually be used to best advantage if a person consults with a skilled trial attorney first, before ever stepping foot inside that courtroom.

As for this latest anti-DWI campaign, according to a recent news article, policemen from the township of Bloomfield, NJ, have joined the hundreds of other municipal and state patrol officers who are all putting in extra hours to catch and arrest flagrant violators, as well as those unsuspecting motorists who may not even realize they are impaired behind the wheel. As reports have stated to date, Bloomfield Twp. police will also be cracking down on inebriated drivers as part of the 2014 Labor Day “Drive Sober” campaign.

During the effort, local cops and state troopers will be involved in roving “saturation” patrols in search of drunk drivers, as well as manning a variety of sobriety roadblocks throughout the state in order to apprehend and deter violators. As in years past, the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign is a nationwide effort created to raise awareness about the dangers and consequences of DWI. This is typically accomplished via high-visibility police enforcement and public awareness tools, which include banners and posters, plus video display signs erected in certain parts of the state.

As usual, law enforcement authorities recommend that anyone looking to drink during this end-of-summer holiday period use common sense to avoid being stopped and arrested for DWI or drug DUI. Some suggestions from police agencies all over the Garden State for those individuals who plan to drink alcohol:

— Prior to going out, choose a designated sober driver who will not drink alcohol

— Plan to use mass transit – such as a train, bus or taxi — to get home after the revelry
— Think about spending the night nearby where the celebrations are being held

For those wishing to assist the police in making New Jersey’s roadways safer during the holiday weekend, law enforcement officials ask that you:

— Report any possibly impaired drivers to law enforcement by dialing #77 to report drunk or aggressive drivers
— Use your safety belt every time you drive or ride in a motor vehicle. This applies to everyone in a car, regardless of his or her seating position. Seatbelts are your best defense against being serious injured or killed by a drunken driver
— Don’t attempt to walk home if you are intoxicated. Severe or fatal accidents have been known to happen to intoxicated pedestrians as well. If you’re under the influence and traveling on foot, the best bet is to hail a cab or ask a sober friend or relative to get you home safely

Bloomfield police participate in ‘Drive Sober’ campaign, NorthJersey.com, August 28, 2014