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If you have been arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI), call our New Jersey DWI attorneys to discuss your case and begin planning your next steps. These are extremely serious charges that should never be taken lightly since they can negatively impact many aspects of your future. For years, we have zealously advocated for New Jersey clients and you can rest assured that if we take on your case, we will proudly do the same for you.

Potential New Law

New Jersey lawmakers are considering revamping New Jersey DWI laws to reduce the amount of time for which a person caught driving under the influence in the state would lose their driver’s license. But there is a catch. In exchange, the driver would be mandated to install an ignition interlock device into his or her vehicle. An ignition interlock device is a breathalyzer for a person’s vehicle, which requires that the driver blow into a mouthpiece on the device before starting the vehicle. Currently, state law requires repeat drunk drivers and first-time drunk drivers with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .15 or higher to install ignition interlock devices; however, the installation of these devices is not legally required for other first time offenders.

If you have been charged with a DWI in New Jersey, it is imperative to consult a reputable New Jersey DWI attorney who practices this area of law. At our firm, we will examine the circumstances surrounding your arrest and figure out the DWI defense tactics that may work in your situation.

Electric motor scooters are fun to ride but they can be dangerous if they are operated in an irresponsible manner. A 28-year-old man in Los Angeles was recently convicted for driving under the influence while operating a Bird electric scooter. It is the very first motorized scooter drunk driving instance that the city has prosecuted. The man was determined to have a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .279, in excess of three times the limit allowed by law at the time of the accident in which he hit a 64-year-old pedestrian on the sidewalk. Once the accident took place, the man on the scooter did not stop and help the injured man who fell on the sidewalk and sustained a minor injury.

Drunk Driving in New Jersey

In New Jersey, it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs. A person can be charged with a DWI if they drive a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content of 0.08 percent or higher. Furthermore, any drug that interferes with a person’s ability to drive in a safe manner can also give rise to a DWI charge.

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A driving while intoxicated (DWI) charge can be incredibly daunting. If you were charged with driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol in New Jersey, you must contact an experienced New Jersey DWI attorney as soon as possible. Many DWI charges and convictions rely heavily on the results of breathalyzer tests, which are not always accurate. We will examine the breath tests in your case to identify any errors or issues that may have unfairly impacted the results.

Earlier this month, the New Jersey Supreme court ruled that breathalyzer evidence from over 20,000 drunk driving cases is not admissible because of a calibration error. In fact, the justices unanimously determined that criminal charges pending against a state police sergeant made Alcotest device results from five counties inadmissible as evidence due to the fact that the sergeant missed an obligatory step in the calibration procedure. The court’s decision means that 20,000 DWI convictions could be tossed out. It is important to note that the court ruling does not automatically expunge all the DWI convictions.

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If you were charged with drinking and driving, you may assume that you are automatically guilty; however, this simply not the case. You have rights and our reputable New Jersey DWI lawyers can help protect those rights. You can take comfort in the fact that are dedicated to providing aggressive and experienced representation through every stage of the legal process.

T.S., 26, was killed in an auto accident in 2014 in Belmar. She was a passenger in her Honda Civic, which was driven by her boyfriend, E.M., in the early hours of Easter morning. E.M. ran a red light and hit another car causing the Civil to flip over and land in the parking lot at Belmar Marina. T.S., who was not wearing a seatbelt, was ejected from the vehicle and landed in the Shark River. An autopsy later revealed that her cause of death was drowning and blunt force trauma to her head. E.M.’s BAC was .207 at the time of the wreck according to law enforcement and he was later sentenced to prison for 10 years.

T.S.’s family sued the restaurant alleging that the establishment continued to serve E.M. despite the fact that he was visibility inebriated, offering evidence eyewitnesses accounts of E.M.’s conduct, security video from the bar, and his BAC level. The bar owners have now settled the lawsuit with the family for $1.5 million.

Death by auto is an extremely serious criminal charge that should not be taken lightly. If you have been charged with death by auto, you need a reputable New Jersey criminal defense lawyer who focuses exclusively in defending against criminal charges. We will meticulously assess the details of your case and determine what legal defenses we may be able to raise on your behalf.

A former New Jersey police officer was recently sentenced to nine months in jail in an accident that killed a motorcycle rider last Halloween. Specifically, the officer will serve 270 days in county jail as a condition of the three years probation he will serve when he is released. Law enforcement says the defendant officer was off duty when he drove a jeep under the influence and crashed into a motorcycle, killing 29-year-old victim J.L. The officer later pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide, tampering with physical evidence and driving while intoxicated. In addition, the officer is no longer employed by the Elizabeth Police Department.

Death by Auto

In New Jersey, vehicular homicide, also known as death by auto, is a criminal charge from being the cause of death by driving an automobile recklessly. Reckless can be established through a few factors including intoxication. Essentially, a driver acts recklessly behind the wheel when he or she drives with an active disregard of a significant risk that death would occur from his or her driving behavior.

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Were you or someone close to you recently arrested for drugged driving in New Jersey? If so, we can help you defend against these charges. Our hard-working New Jersey DWI attorneys will work diligently to have your charges reduced or, if possible, dropped altogether. We will review your case and discuss all of your legal options with you during a free, no obligation consultation.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recently revealed that motor vehicle accidents in states where recreational marijuana is now legal have gone up by 6 percent. The increase has been seen in states such as Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington where marijuana is legal for recreational use when compared to neighboring states where the drug is still illegal. However, everyone may not agree with these findings. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration claimed that marijuana use was not likely to contribute to traffic accidents in any significant way a few years ago in 2015 and has not appeared to change its position on the matter. It is important to note that marijuana is still an illegal controlled substance under federal law.

Drug DWIs In New Jersey

In New Jersey, DWI does not only apply to driving while intoxicated by alcohol. Rather, any substance that hinders a person’s ability to drive safely, even minimally, can lead to being charged with a DWI. A drug DWI, also referred to as driving under the influence of drugs (DUID), in New Jersey takes place when a person’s normal use of mental or physical faculties are weakened due to a drug or any combination of drugs. This includes any drugs, whether they are illegal, controlled substances and over-the counter medications. Common examples of drugs that give rise to a DUID charge include:

  • Marijuana;
  • Cocaine;
  • Opiates;
  • Xanax; and/or
  • Sleeping pills.

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If you are a school bus driver and you have been charged with drunk driving, you should consider immediately reaching out to a New Jersey DWI attorney. This charge should never be taken lightly as it can turn your whole life upside down and leave your financial future in a state of uncertainty, as commercial drivers face much more serious consequences than private drivers for DWI offenses. Just because you have been charged does not mean you are guilty – you can rest assured that we will examine every detail of your case and build the strongest possible defense on your behalf.

 A New Jersey school bus driver was placed under arrest after law enforcement officials claimed he hit a few different cars while driving under the influence of alcohol. Specifically, the bus driver purportedly hit five vehicles with occupants inside, a minimum of two traffic poles and one fire hydrant early in the morning in an incident last month. Reportedly, one person sustained minor injuries because of the wreck. At the time of the accident, there was only a 9-year-old child and a female bus aide on the bus. The driver was charged with driving under the influence, driving while suspended and reckless driving.

Distinguishing Private from Commercial DWIs

In New Jersey, a person who is 21 years of age or older and holds a normal driver’s license is guilty of driving while intoxicated (DWI) if he or she operates a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or higher. While the law defines a 0.08 percent BAC as the legal threshold, the reality is that you can be convicted of the offense even if your BAC is lower than 0.08 percent. It is important to note that, under New Jersey law, the rules differ for commercial drivers, including bus drivers. Bus drivers are prohibited from operating a bus with a BAC of 0.04 percent or higher. Commercial drivers face much harsher penalties for drunk driving offenses than private drivers.

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Drunk driving is a serious offense in New Jersey but drunk driving with a minor in the car is even worse. If you were charged with drunk driving and you had a child in the car with you at the time, you need to consult a diligent New Jersey DWI lawyer as soon as possible. This is an extremely serious charge that can adversely impact your personal and professional life. Our firm is committed to protecting your rights and making sure that you obtain the most favorable outcome in your case.

Actor Marion “Pooch” Hall was recently placed under arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol with his toddler son apparently in his lap and crashing into a parked car. Witnesses called 911 after seeing the toddler on his lap and noticing that the vehicle had been weaving in and out of traffic before hitting a parked car. Fortunately, no one was injured. According to police, Hall showed obvious signs of intoxication and was unable to perform field sobriety tests. In addition, his blood alcohol content (BAC) was 0.25, three times the legal limit. The police also determined the toddler was inside the car and he was not restrained as mandated by the law. Hall was charged with drunk driving and child endangerment.

While this incident took place in California, the sad truth is that these sorts of accidents also happen in New Jersey and everywhere else in the country.

If you have been charged with death by auto or vehicular homicide, you probably understand the gravity of the situation. Understanding the charges you are facing is critical to deciding how to move forward. Our hard-working New Jersey DWI attorneys understand how to protect your rights when you are charged with such a serious crime. We are here to answer your questions and address your concerns every step of the way.

A New Jersey woman was recently sentenced to six years in state prison for a drunk driving accident that killed a 49-year-old man. The woman pled guilty to one count of second degree vehicular homicide and driving while intoxicated for hitting the victim, W.O., with her car and ultimately being the cause of his death. According to law enforcement, the woman was driving her Jeep Wrangler when she struck the victim, who worked for a private recycling company when the wreck took place. W.O. was rushed to the hospital where he was pronounced dead due to severe injuries sustained in the accident.

Second-Degree Vehicular Homicide in New Jersey

In New Jersey, an individual can be convicted of vehicular homicide for causing the death of another person by operating a vehicle recklessly. Reckless driving means that you drove with a conscious disregard for human life with a significant risk to the public. If the prosecution establishes certain circumstances under which the accident took place, the jury can infer that a defendant drove recklessly. One of these circumstances is if the driver got behind the wheel under the influence of alcohol or drugs then the jury can infer that he or she drove recklessly. In New Jersey, a person is driving while intoxicated (DWI) when he or she operates a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content of 0.08 percent or higher.

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A DWI arrest can be scary and extremely high-stakes, as a conviction can adversely impact almost every aspect of your life. If you have been charged with a DWI, you should know that you have rights. Our trusted New Jersey DWI attorneys work hard to deliver the highest quality counsel representation in DWI cases. You can rest assured that we understand what is at stake, which is why we will build the strongest possible defense in your case. 

Proposed Law

A proposed state law would expand the DWI ignition interlock program in New Jersey. Currently, you only have to have an ignition interlock device is you have a BAC of .15 or higher or if you are a repeat offender. Under the new law, anyone convicted of a DWI would be required to have the device installed in his or her vehicle for three to 18 months, depending on how drunk the driver was. The device works like a Breathalyzer, if your BAC is too high, your car will not start.