Our DWI Credentials are Exceptional, 7 DWI Defense Lawyers
Our work has been featured in
The Star Ledger
CNBC
LAW & ORDER
Asbury Park Press
ABC
House M.D.
USA Today

crash

Just last week, a former New Jersey police officer was convicted of drunk driving and causing a wrong-way accident that ended up killing a fellow officer as well as another friend. The cop is now facing up to 25 years in prison, the maximum for his crimes.

Prosecutors say that at the time of the crash, the former Linden police officer’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was 0.24, three times higher than the legal limit in New York, which is 0.08 percent. The defendant was driving the wrong way on the highway when he crashed head-on into a tractor-trailer. The crash occurred in March 2015 as the defendant and three of his friends were heading home to New Jersey after a night of drinking in New York.

In New Jersey, as in New York, the basic offense of driving while intoxicated (DWI) consists of operating a motor vehicle with a BAC of 0.08 percent or more. If you drive while you are drunk and kill someone in an accident, you will likely be charged with either vehicular homicide or vehicular manslaughter under Section 2C:11-5 of New Jersey’s criminal code.

Continue reading

motorcycleMotorcycles can be a great way to enjoy the open roads. Motorcycle riders, however, should be especially careful on the roads, due to the high risk of injury associated with accidents. Unfortunately, this does not always happen. Each year, many motorcyclists are arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated (DWI). If this has happened to you or someone close to you, it is imperative to reach out to a skilled New Jersey DWI attorney who can help you understand your rights.

Under New Jersey law, an individual who wants to ride a motorcycle must obtain either a motorcycle-only license or a motorcycle endorsement to his or her current driver’s license. This can be done in one of two ways. A person can complete a Motorcycle Safety Education Basic Rider Course or obtain a motorcycle permit and take a road test. Anyone under the age of 18 must complete the former option, which means he or she must complete the safety course.

Motorcycle riders are subject to the same traffic laws as any other motorist on the road. As a result, motorcyclists must adhere to all of the speed limits, road signs, and DWI laws. In New Jersey, a person with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or greater who operates a motor vehicle is considered to be driving while intoxicated.

Continue reading

law officeDriving while intoxicated (DWI) is one of the most commonly charged offenses in the state of New Jersey. The Department of Justice found that more than 24,000 people were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol in New Jersey in 2013 alone. This number averages out to more than 65 DWI arrests each day of the year.

The basic offense of a DWI consists of an individual operating a vehicle with a BAC of 0.08 percent or greater. You should know that even if your BAC is below 0.08 percent, you can still be convicted of a DWI if your ability to drive was impaired. Essentially, you should not get behind the wheel if your ability to drive has been negatively affected by any substance.

While most people are familiar with the idea of plea bargaining, they are often misinformed about what that means in the context of DWI cases. Plea bargaining simply refers to a dismissal or a downgrade of a charge. Plea bargains are not available in New Jersey DWI cases. In fact, the Attorney General has issued directives to all of the Municipal Courts and prosecutors, banning all plea bargains in DWI cases.

Continue reading

drugsIn recent years, public awareness campaigns coupled with law enforcement measures have successfully lowered the overall rate of drunk driving in New Jersey and across the United States. Interestingly enough, however, drugged driving has been on the rise. If you or your loved one has been charged with drugged driving, you need to consult a seasoned New Jersey DWI attorney as soon as possible. These charges should never be taken lightly because they can have a serious negative impact on almost every aspect of your life.

Earlier this month, golf champion Tiger Woods was stopped and charged with driving under the influence of medication, bringing attention to the huge problem of drugged driving. A recent report by the Governor’s Highway Safety Association along with the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility revealed that drugged driving has surpassed drunk driving as a factor in deadly crashes. Statistics indicate that drugs were present in 43 percent of drivers in crash fatalities, a 25 percent increase since 2012.

After his arrest, Woods insisted that the incident was due to a bad reaction to prescription medication, rather than due to alcohol. But does that really make a difference? The short answer is no. In New Jersey, a person who is driving under the influence of drugs may be committing the offense of driving while intoxicated (DWI).

Continue reading

gavelBeing formally convicted of a DWI is a very serious matter that can have adverse and far-reaching consequences for many aspects of your life. If you have been convicted of a DWI, you may be able to appeal the decision in certain situations. An experienced New Jersey DWI attorney can assess the merits of your case and help determine whether you have sufficient grounds for an appeal. Our firm has handled many DWI cases, and you can rest assured that we know how to navigate these types of situations.

Under New Jersey law, the offense of driving while intoxicated consists of operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or greater. Individuals under the age of 21 will be charged with a DWI with a BAC of 0.02 percent. For commercial drivers, the legal limit is 0.04 percent or higher.

An individual convicted of a DWI in New Jersey can appeal his or her conviction. When a defendant appeals a conviction, he or she is asking a higher appellate court to review the case for legal or procedural errors. It is important to note that the appeals procedure is time-consuming and requires a lot of paperwork. In addition, strict deadlines need to be met, or you will lose the right to appeal.

Continue reading

passport

DWI charges can have serious consequences for anyone’s life, but the consequences can be much greater if the person who gets charged is not a citizen of the United States. Undocumented immigrants and U.S. citizens alike can benefit from a skilled New Jersey DWI attorney when facing these types of circumstances.

A person will be charged with driving while intoxicated (DWI) in New Jersey if he or she is found to be operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. Individuals who are convicted of a DWI face numerous penalties, such as fines, imprisonment, license suspension, and more.

In general, there are two types of visas:  immigrant and non-immigrant. The former allow people to live here, work, pay taxes, and benefit from U.S. programs until they eventually naturalize and become citizens. The latter allow people to come to the United States for a limited purpose and time frame, such as a job. While a person’s green card is less susceptible to revocation, federal immigration law allows for non-immigrant visas to be denied or revoked much more easily. While a non-immigrant visa holder whose visa has been revoked will have the opportunity to offer evidence as to why they should be allowed to stay, Department of Homeland Security officers make the ultimate decision.

Continue reading

drunk driving

A DWI charge can have serious consequences for many aspects of your life, including your job, housing, and reputation. If you have been charged with a DWI, you need a skilled New Jersey DWI attorney to protect your rights. Time is of the essence, so it is important to act quickly. We are here to answer your questions and address your concerns.

Under New Jersey law, driving while intoxicated (DWI) consists of a person with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or greater operating a motor vehicle. An individual who holds a commercial driver’s license is held to a much higher standard as a professional driver. These drivers will be driving while intoxicated if their BAC is 0.04 percent or higher. Drivers under the age of 21 will be considered to be legally impaired if their BAC is 0.02 percent or higher.

It is important to note that New Jersey law permits prosecutors to establish a DWI charge in many different ways. Typically, the strongest evidence comes in the form of BAC, which is discovered through a breath, blood, or urine test. However, prosecutors can also submit witness testimony, specifically testimony by an arresting officer and any other individuals who saw or interacted with the defendant at the time of the arrest. The New Jersey Supreme Court has ruled that no precise expertise is needed to develop an opinion that an individual is drunk based on observations of that individual.

Continue reading

carDriving is a privilege, rather than a right. Losing your driver’s license as a result of a DWI can have far-reaching consequences for your life. In fact, your ability to drive to work or school and even to do day-to-day tasks can automatically be limited. If you have been charged with a DWI, you should reach out to a skilled New Jersey DWI attorney who can assess the details of your case. You can trust that we will work diligently to try to get the charges against you dismissed or at least minimize the penalties you may be facing.

In New Jersey, the basic offense of driving while intoxicated consists of operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or above. If your blood alcohol is determined to be this amount or higher, the state can prove the case under what is known as a per se violation. A per se violation is an act that is in itself an offense against the law and results in automatic liability. In the context of a DWI, a per se violation would mean that the individual has violated the DWI statute in the state by having a BAC over the legal amount.

Under New Jersey law, those convicted of driving while intoxicated face a license suspension and, unlike in other states, are not eligible for any type of temporary or conditional license that would allow them to drive to work. If your license is suspended, you will not be allowed to drive under any circumstances. There are no exceptions to this rule.

Continue reading

blood testIf you have been charged with a DWI based on a blood sample that you were forced to provide, you need to know your rights. An experienced New Jersey criminal defense attorney can help you do just that. A conviction for driving while intoxicated (DWI) can have long-lasting effects on your ability to drive or be insured. This is why it is vital to act quickly to develop a strong criminal defense.

Drunk driving is a big problem in New Jersey and throughout the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three traffic deaths involve a drunk driver. Between 2003 and 2012, approximately 1,816 people were killed in crashes involving a drunk driver in New Jersey. While it is a serious issue, there are also cases in which an individual is unfairly convicted of a DWI based on shoddy evidence, such as a faulty blood test.

Prosecutors usually rely on a defendant’s blood alcohol content (BAC) to establish that he or she was driving while intoxicated (DWI). The basic offense of a DWI in New Jersey consists of an individual operating a motor vehicle with a BAC of 0.08 percent or higher.

Continue reading

blue pillsDriving under the influence of drugs, legal or illegal, can be a serious offense in New Jersey. If you or someone close to you has been arrested for driving under the influence of drugs (DUID), it is important to reach out to an experienced New Jersey DUID attorney who can help you understand your rights. A conviction for driving under the influence of drugs can have serious and far-reaching consequences for your life. Don’t let this type of charge stain your clean record.

Under New Jersey Statute 39:4-50, drugged driving laws prohibit “any narcotic, hallucinogenic or habit-producing drug.” Illegal drugs, over-the-counter medication, and prescription medication can all form a basis for a New Jersey drugged driving charge, since all of these have the potential to impair an individual’s ability to drive, just as alcohol does. If you have a medical condition that necessitates the use of a banned substance, you must establish that it did not impair your ability to drive, or you must not drive.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), drugged driving can have the same effects as drunk driving, putting others on the road at risk. According to one NIDA report, a nationwide study of deadly motor vehicle crashes found that almost 50 percent of the drivers who had tested positive for drugs had consumed a prescription drug, such as a painkiller or anxiety medication. The National Highway Safety Traffic Administration reports that in a recent survey, nearly one in four drivers tested positive for at least one drug that could affect safety.

Continue reading