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New Jersey police are allowed to set up roadblocks for the specific purpose of spotting drunk drivers. If you or a loved one has been arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI) as a result of a DWI checkpoint, we may be able to help you. Our New Jersey criminal defense attorneys understand how to defend you against DWI charges. These charges are extremely serious, which is why it is imperative to talk to an experienced lawyer in the area to find out how the law applies to your specific case. 

Law enforcement agencies from the New Jersey area are getting ready for the state’s biggest yearly drunk driving clampdown. The 2019 “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” statewide Labor Day crackdown starts on August 16,2019 and ends on September 2,2019. During this time, police officers and local law enforcement officers will be conducting sobriety checkpoints and police will target motorists who may be driving while impaired by alcohol or drugs. The national campaign is intended to raise awareness about the hazards of driving while intoxicated and is supported by a number of different activities such as national radio and television commercials, posters, signs and more. One of the campaign’s specific goals is to reduce drunk driving around the Labor Day holiday. During last year’s campaign, agencies who participated made 1,196 DWI arrests.

Under New Jersey law, police may lawfully use a DWI checkpoint for purposes of reducing drunk driving. A roadblock or checkpoint is generally legal if the public interest in having it outweighs the inconvenience and intrusion to drivers on the road. In other words, these checkpoints are constitutional because courts have decided that detecting drunk drivers and removing them from the roads serves an important societal interest that outweighs the rights of drivers to be free from brief stops at checkpoints. Typically, probable cause must exist in order for police to stop a vehicle so a checkpoint is an exception to that rule.

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If you have been charged with drunk driving, you may be facing strict and debilitating penalties. Our New Jersey DWI lawyers understand the state’s criminal defense laws and we know first hand that experience counts. Having handled and resolved countless DWI cases, we know how to provide clients with a full legal defense in an effort to mitigate adverse consequences.. Acting quickly after being charged is imperative in these cases, so please do not wait to call our office.

Despite countless awareness campaigns surrounding the dangers of drunk driving, it continues to be a major problem. A new study published by the American Addiction Centers revealed some alarming trends about drinking and driving habits in the US. The report surveyed 600 Americans. When examining the number of times individuals had driven after drinking in the preceding 30 days, the survey found that 23.2 percent of people admitted to driving after drinking at least 1-2 times and 21.7 percent of respondents admitted to drinking and driving over 6 times. Shockingly, 36 percent admitted to driving while blackout drunk while almost 50 percent admitted to being passengers of a drunk driver. In addition, 53.5 percent of survey respondents said they feel capable of driving after drinking as opposed to 46.5 percent who said they do not.

Just because drunk driving is a major problem in the country does not mean everyone charged with the offense is guilty. New Jersey law makes it a criminal offense to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or higher if you are 21 years of age or older. The legal limit is lower for individuals under 21 as well as for commercial drivers. If you have been charged with a DWI, one of the following defenses may be applicable in your case:

DWI cases are complex and can impact virtually every aspect of your life. If you have been arrested for DWI, you need to find competent and reliable legal representation immediately. Our New Jersey drunk driving advocates have extensive experience handling and protecting the rights of clients, and we can help you obtain the best possible outcome under the circumstances of your case.

Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety is an alliance of consumer, medical, public health and safety groups, insurance companies and agents working together to make roads across the country safer. The group is now urging the Governor of New Jersey to sign into law Senate Bill 824 (the “Bill”) – legislation that would require ignition interlock devices (IID) for all convicted drunk drivers. The Bill is designed to crack down on first-time offenders with a BAC of 0.08 percent or higher, requiring these offenders to get an interlock device for a period of at least 30 days. Currently, first-time offenders whose BAC is between 0.08 percent to 0.14 percent simply get their license suspended, which supporters of the new law say is not a harsh enough deterrent. If the Bill is signed into law, New Jersey will become the thirty-fourth state in the nation with an all-offender ignition interlock law.

Under New Jersey law, you will be charged with a DWI if your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is 0.08 percent or higher. You should note that you can be prosecuted for drunk driving even if your BAC is below 0.08 percent if you were unfit to operate a motor vehicle as a result of alcohol consumption. New Jersey has a “zero-tolerance” policy for underage drivers. As such, for individuals under the age of 21, the legal limit is 0.01 percent. For those with commercial driver’s licenses, the legal limit is 0.04 percent.
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Everyone makes mistakes, but if a police officer or a New Jersey prosecutor makes an error in your case, it should not hurt you and your future. If you have been charged with driving while intoxicated (DWI), do not underestimate the importance of having a skilled legal advocate on your side. Our diligent New Jersey DWI attorneys will thoroughly review the facts and build the strongest possible defense in your case. We understand how high the stakes are, which is why we will zealously protect your rights at each stage of the legal process.

Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the country have experienced some type of harm due to another person’s conduct while drinking, according to research recently published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. The study found that in 2015, about 53 million adults – or roughly 20 percent – indicated that they had gone through at least one harm, which could be attributed to someone else’s drinking in the prior twelve months. That harm varied from property damage to bodily injury. This risk is especially significant for driving-related incidents. In fact, heavy drinkers were 12 times more likely to have been involved in a crash or in a vehicle with a drunk driver than the rest of the population.

Driving under the influence of alcohol is against the law in New Jersey. When you are arrested for a DWI, the police will administer a breath test, which will determine your blood alcohol concentration (BAC). A driver who is 21 years of age or above will be charged with a DWI if his or her BAC is 0.08 percent or higher. If a driver is under the age of 21, however, that individual will be charged with a DWI if his or her BAC is 0.01 percent or higher. The legal limit for commercial drivers is a BAC of 0.04 percent or higher.

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Being arrested for driving while high is not something you should take lightly. You could face a suspended license, hefty fines and maybe even jail time. If you have been charged with a DWI, it is in your best interest to retain the services of an experienced New Jersey DWI attorney. With years of experience, we understand how to effectively fight for your rights both in the context of a settlement negotiation and in the courtroom.

According to a new study by the AAA, almost 70 percent of Americans believe it is unlikely that a driver will get caught for getting behind the wheel while high on marijuana. In addition, the researchers noted that approximately 14.8 million drivers in the last month, nationwide, reported having driven within one hour of smoking, injecting or covering themselves with a marijuana product. This is alarming because it can take between one and four hours after using marijuana to feel its impairing effects. Data also shows that an increased number of Americans approve of driving after using marijuana (7 percent) as compared to driving under the influence of alcohol (1.6 percent). Young drivers tend to be the most pro-pot, with 14 percent admitting to operating a motor vehicle an hour after using.

Perhaps the prevalence of driving while high doesn’t come as much of a surprise considering marijuana is now legal several states and may very well be legal in New Jersey in the near future. In New Jersey, it is currently against the law to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs. When it comes to impairment caused by alcohol, a person will be charged with a DWI if his or her blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is 0.08 percent or higher.

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Driving while intoxicated (DWI) tends to spike around certain holidays and the Fourth of July is one of them. To deter drunk driving, police departments often set up checkpoints to catch intoxicated drivers. If you have been arrested for a DWI at a checkpoint, it is crucial to contact a New Jersey DWI attorney who can defend you. At our firm, we understand how overzealous police officers can be in charging people with a DWI, especially on a holiday like Independence Day when they actively look for drunk drivers. We will investigate the legality of the checkpoint and examine your case for any procedural errors made by police that could be used in your defense.

As the Fourth of July holiday approaches, police departments across New Jersey have planned sobriety checkpoints in hopes to discourage the public from getting behind the wheel while intoxicated. Unfortunately, deadly accidents tend to spike on Independence Day. In fact, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has found that the Fourth of July is the most dangerous day to be on the road and alcohol plays a large part in that. Not only can alcohol lead to deadly wrecks between cars, alcohol can also be a factor in pedestrian deaths. Even when it is not a major holiday, drunk driving is a major problem in the United States. Data from the National Highway Safety Administration reveals that 10, 874 people were killed in alcohol-related accidents across the country in 2017. Of the 624 traffic deaths that took place in New Jersey, about 125 of them were a result of the involvement of alcohol.

While DWI checkpoints are prohibited in some states, New Jersey is not one of them. However, in order for a checkpoint to be legal, certain criteria must be met. In other words, the police are not permitted to make a roadblock wherever they want and whenever they feel like it. Rather, the check point must be temporary and set up at a specified location, date and time; a supervisory authority must have established the checkpoint; the public must be given prior notice about the checkpoint; the checkpoint must have been created in the interest of public safety or law enforcement goals; and the procedures used at the checkpoint must be specific and neutral.

Drunk driving charges can impact virtually every aspect of your existence. If you’ve been arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI), you need to call a New Jersey DWI attorney immediately. While an arrest for DWI can seriously interfere with your life, a DWI conviction can be even worse. You may lose your driver’s license, be required to pay substantial fines and you can even face jail time. Because the stakes are so high, DWI charges should never be taken lightly. With extensive understanding of the state’s drunk driving laws, you can take comfort in knowing that we will provide an aggressive defense in your case.

A 34-year-old New Jersey teacher was charged with a DWI after crashing her car into a pizza shop in Camden County last month. Footage of the incident shows the woman barreling her car into the front of the store. The accident destroyed much of the store and left three employees inside the restaurant with minor injuries, according to the prosecutor’s office. The driver was taken to the hospital by authorities where she consented to a blood draw. Her blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was determined to be .195, more than twice the legal limit. The pizza restaurant is now closed until further notice.

As in other states, a person in the state of New Jersey can be charged with a DWI if he or she exceeds the legal intoxication limit. Under state law, a driver who is found to be operating a motor vehicle with a BAC 0.08 percent of higher can be held liable for a DWI. You should be aware, however, that a DWI charge is not limited to alcohol consumption. Any substance that reduces a driver’s reaction time or hinders a person’s ability to drive safely can lead to a DWI as well. This includes mind-altering substances such as marijuana, and other illegal drugs, as well as over the counter or even prescription drugs.

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Driving while intoxicated (DWI) is a serious offense in New Jersey and it is even more problematic if someone gets hurt. If a person is injured or killed because of a drunk driver, that driver will be charged with assault by auto, which is an extremely serious criminal charge. An arrest for assault by auto should be handled properly from the get-go. No one understands this better than our experienced New Jersey DWI attorneys. We will meticulously examine the facts of your case and help defend your rights at every stage of the legal process.

A 19-year-old MIT student, who was home in New Jersey for the summer, was recently killed in a head-on crash caused by a suspected drunk driver in Old Bridge. The teen, who was offered a full scholarship to both MIT and Yale University, had her promising future tragically cut short when the other driver traversed the double yellow lines at a high rate of speed and slammed into the her vehicle head-on. The MIT student was behind the wheel and her 15-year-old sister was in the car as a passenger at the time of the accident. Both of them were rushed to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, where the older sister was pronounced dead. The passenger survived and was treated for her injuries. According to officials, the suspected drunk driver attempted to walk away from the scene of the crash but was apprehended by police while doing so. He now faces multiple charges including vehicular homicide, leaving the scene of an accident, assault by auto and DWI.

New Jersey law has specific provisions for assault cases involving automobiles. A person is typically charged with assault by auto when his or her reckless driving causes injury to another person. For behavior to be deemed ‘reckless,’ it must involve actions that show an extreme indifference to the welfare of others. Examples of reckless conduct include excessive speeding, driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol, or refusing to submit to a breath test. If an assault by auto charge involves driving under the influence of alcohol, the charge is much more serious. If an assault by auto case causes “serious bodily injury” to another person due to a DWI accident, the charge is a Third Degree criminal offense. In such cases, the defendant faces 5 to 10 years in jail.
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Driving while intoxicated (DWI) is a serious offense and a conviction can have serious negative effects on an individual’s life. If you have been arrested for driving under the influence of drugs, it is critical that your rights are protected. Our experienced New Jersey DWI attorneys will examine the facts of your case and prepare a vigorous defense in your legal matter. We understand that it seems like the laws are stacked against you, but we know how to find weaknesses in the prosecution’s case that can be used to your advantage.

A new study indicates that riding with an impaired driver is common among young adults. In fact, 33 percent of those who graduated from high school recently admitted to riding in a vehicle with a substance-impaired driver at least once in the last year. The research was conducted using reports from the National Institute of Child and Human Development’s NEXT Generation Health Study, which examined data from a study that spanned seven years and included information on more than 2,700 US adolescents beginning at grade 10.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, also found that young adults are more likely to ride with a driver who is impaired by marijuana (23 percent) than a driver who is impaired by alcohol (20 percent). In addition, about 6 percent of young adults had gotten into an automobile with a driver impaired by harder, illicit drugs (i.e., cocaine). Researchers point out that those who have gotten into a vehicle with an intoxicated driver in the past are more likely to drive under the influence themselves and have a greater likelihood of riding with an intoxicated driver in the future.

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For teenagers across New Jersey and the U.S., the beginning of summer generally means more time and freedom to do what they want. Unfortunately, DWI arrests and traffic deaths for teens seem to spike during this time frame as well. If you or your loved one has been placed under arrest for an underage DWI, you should call a New Jersey DWI defense attorney as soon as possible. These charges are extremely serious and can negatively affect almost every aspect of your life, including your future education, employment, and even housing opportunities.

According to an AAA study, more than 1,000 people are killed in accidents involving a teen driver between Memorial Day and Labor Day – a period known as the 100 Deadliest Days of summer. On average, about 10 deaths a day are reported, which is a 14 percent spike compared to the rest of the year. AAA says that that speeding is the biggest contributor to these deadly accidents, followed by impaired driving. In fact, impaired driving was cited as a factor in about 17 percent of deadly accidents involving a teen driver, which is even more alarming because teenagers are not legally allowed to consume alcohol. AAA data reveal that about one out of six teen drivers involved in a deadly accident over the summer months tested positive for alcohol.

In New Jersey, there is a DWI statute for underage offenders. You can be charged with an underage DWI, commonly known as a “baby DWI,” if you are under the age of 21 and are operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.01 percent or higher. It is important to note that if your BAC is 0.08 percent or higher, you will be charged with a regular DWI in addition to the underage offense.

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